Posts Tagged ‘fidel castro’

…than objecting to deifying a murderous communist dictator who has made his little island so wonderful that for decades people have risked drowning in the open ocean to escape it.

Yup sure is crazy congratulations Atlantic you figured out that stuff like this:

We are supposed to conclude that Cuba is no longer a threat to global stability and that Fidel is a reformed tyrant. But how believable is a guy whose revolution all but wiped out Cuba’s tiny Jewish community of 15,000, and who spent the past 50 years supporting the terrorism of the Palestinian Liberation Organization, Syria, Libya and Iran? And how does Castro explain Venezuela, where Cuban intelligence agents run things, Iran is an ally and anti-Semitism has been state policy in recent years? Mr. Goldberg doesn’t go there with Fidel.

…doesn’t have any bearing on if Castro’s polemic against antisemitism is sincere. We don’t need the evidence we have the word of “the great man” Fidel!

I really should stop being surprised at the left constant love affair with communist dictators as Alberto de la Cruz puts it:

His sycophantic descriptions of a murderous monster turned loving teddy bear turns the stomach of all but the most ignorant.

It doesn’t turn my stomach, but it will make the day when this salt water version of the Berlin wall falls and the records are displayed even more embarrassed to those who have worshiped at its altar…

…if they are capable of embarrassment that is.

memeorandum thread here

A close second on the Irony scale? A Marxist, anarchist , atheist commenting on the morality of Martin Perez’s Harvard gift. The mind boggles.

In 1941 Governor Lee “Pappy” McDaniel ran in a special election for an open Senate seat created by the death of Senator John Sheppard (an interesting fact is that a son of Sam Houston the 1st president of Texas born in 1793 was appointed as a “placeholder” senator during the time between the death and the election). His primary opponent was Lyndon Johnson then a congressman from the 10th district. The two primary candidates fought it out and both were involved in some underhanded tactics however at the end of the day it looked like Johnson had the game won until (According to Robert Caro in his book The Years of Lyndon Johnson the Path to Power) O’Daniel’s enemies contrived to steal the election FOR him to get him out of the governors office.

It turned out that Pappy although corrupt had one “virtue” and that was dislike for alcohol. Convinced it was the devil’s brew he was prepared to keep “dry” zones around military bases and his foes in the liquor industry wanted him out.

I thought of Pappy O’Daniel when I read this surprising quote from Jeffrey Goldberg’s interview with Fidel Castro:

Over the course of this first, five-hour discussion, Castro repeatedly returned to his excoriation of anti-Semitism. He criticized Ahmadinejad for denying the Holocaust and explained why the Iranian government would better serve the cause of peace by acknowledging the “unique” history of anti-Semitism and trying to understand why Israelis fear for their existence.

It was quite a shock to hear one of the monsters of the 20th century excoriating a modern monster for antisemitism and going on about the long history of Jewish suffering, that’s when I remembered Pappy.

Pappy was an opponent of the dangers of drinking, but it didn’t make him any less a corrupt pol.

Castro if this interview is to be believed believes that antisemitism is a centuries long disgrace and that Israel has a right to exist, that doesn’t make him any less of a murderous thug. I’m not going to fall for his pap any more that the Babliu blog guys will.

As the Doctor once told Margaret the Slitheen it doesn’t matter, you can oppress millions because every now and again you can speak up against an injustice that has nothing to do with you.

memeorandum thread here

Long memories for the oppressed

Posted: August 20, 2010 by datechguy in internet/free speech
Tags: ,

It is fortunate for the world that people like this exist:

I think that I would be too selfish and disloyal to my core values if I limited my magnanimity to my immediate family. You see, I treat all oppressed Cubans as my immediate relatives. When a political prisoner like Orlando Zapata Tamayo goes on a hunger strike and dies to protest the prison conditions, I grieve for him. When Tamayo’s mother tries to visit her son’s grave and is harassed by government-sponsored mobs, I get angry. When college students launch a march on the steps of the University of Havana to protest the state-sponsored apartheid system that is prevalent in Cuba and they are imprisoned, I realize that things will never change for the better as long as a Castro is in power. When I think back to the time when HIV+ gay and lesbian Cubans were forcibly quarantined until 1989 to treatment centers, I pray for the dawning of a more civil and tolerant society. When I see the courage displayed by political prisoners like Dr. Oscar Elias Biscet who has defied the Cuban authorities repeatedly and demanded the restoration of civil rights and liberties to his homeland, I thank God that there are still people left in this world who will stand up to oppression and are willing to die to bring back a Free Cuba. It makes me proud that we have our Frederick Douglas, our Martin Luther Kings, Jr., and our Malcolm X – but with a Cuban flavor.

We may ignore it, we may pretend that it isn’t happening but Cuba remains a prison camp for its population and will be as long as Castro and his cronies are in charge.

It’s important that stories like this aren’t burred amid the rest of the news.

The Washington Post praises president Obama for tough words on Cuba concerning their treatment of strikers:

PRESIDENT OBAMA issued a statement Wednesday that forthrightly described what has become of his effort to reach out to the Castro regime in Cuba. “Instead of embracing an opportunity to enter a new era,” he said, “Cuban authorities continue to respond to the aspirations of the Cuban people with a clenched fist.”

Yes it’s great to see a US president standing forthrightly against a government taking actions so obviously against the will of its people. I wonder what might have prompted the sudden attention to this issue by the administration?