Posts Tagged ‘conservatism fights back’

A few weeks ago a column by Bonnie Erbe to nobody’s surprise who is paying attention (PBS on their online site actually refers to her as “non-partisan” which says more about PBS than it does about her) noted church closing in the East and painted it as a result of the old church orthodoxy:

Dogmatic, dictatorial churches do not resound with today’s spirituality, and young people are not clamoring to join them. So sending a message that says, in essence, “Follow my rules or go to hell” might be a good way of retaining older parishioners used to such harsh boundaries. But as elderly parishioners die off, they take the church’s message with them.

I live in a city where 4 Catholic churches recently closed and it is a shame to see churches close in NY and other urban areas, yet lets look at Dave Weigel’s column today about redistricting which links to this rather good 8 decade chart at the NY Times and what do we see? We see a flight of people not from the church but in general from particular states.

More and more of the faithful youth are fleeing high tax liberal states and settling elsewhere as Michael Barone writes:

Texas’ diversified economy, business-friendly regulations and low taxes have attracted not only immigrants but substantial inflow from the other 49 states. As a result, the 2010 reapportionment gives Texas four additional House seats. In contrast, California gets no new House seats, for the first time since it was admitted to the Union in 1850.

There’s a similar lesson in the fact that Florida gains two seats in the reapportionment and New York loses two.

This leads to a second point, which is that growth tends to be stronger where taxes are lower. Seven of the nine states that do not levy an income tax grew faster than the national average. The other two, South Dakota and New Hampshire, had the fastest growth in their regions, the Midwest and New England.

I suspect that if you want to see where the church is growing and thriving just follow that electoral population.

My oldest son is a solid Catholic who is going to college on a full academic scholarship. As soon as he graduates he plans on getting out of this state and I can’t say as I blame him.

So Bonnie rather than your argument concerning the empty churches I would refer you to Stacy McCain’s explaining the demographic facts of life and Ed Driscoll who says this:

And it seems rather difficult to build an emerging Democratic majority when two of the most prominent “liberal” cities in America (very much in name only, given the mammoth regulatory mazes and bureaucratic armies these cities come equipped with) have such poor future demographics. Or as Mark Steyn, who inspired our headline above with this classic 2006 article, wrote about Europe’s similar (and not at all coincidental) demographic woes, “what’s the point of creating a secular utopia if it’s only for one generation?”

As even Illinois, which is among the democratic states losing a congressional seat, is learning you can’t vote the dead if you oppose them being born.

Back in September I attended the 9/12 rallies in Washington I talked to a lot of tea party members gathered at the capital and asks many questions, this was the most significant one:

“Who here trusts the GOP?” Not a single hand went up, but people over and over promised me that if the GOP spent like the democrats they would be back to throw them out too. No wonder the GOP is scared of the tea party.

Yesterday’s vote on the Omnibus Spending Bill confirmed this. Remember that only Kirk was a tea party win bigtime. It is the most amazing thing to see. Republicans are so afraid of the tea party that even before the Tea Party people are in congress the Republicans are changing.

I really didn’t think I”d see this. I am very pleased.

What are people saying?

Here is Reuters:

Democrats abruptly abandoned a fight over spending on Thursday and said they would instead extend government funding on a temporary basis, a move that gives Republicans a greater chance to enact the deep cuts they have promised.

It’s really sets things up for a change.

Politico is sad:

The decision Thursday night sweeps away months of bipartisan work by the Senate Appropriations Committee which had crafted the $1.1 trillion bill to meet spending targets embraced by Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R—Ky.) himself prior to the elections.

Yup nothing more bi-partisan than taking the public’s money and spending it on pork.

Doug Ross comments on Politico:

See if you can detect the spin from The Politico, the last redoubt of former WaPo reporters who don’t even try to disguise their party allegiance.

Bazinga!

National review’s Rich Lowry sees it for what it is

Tonight may indeed may be a “seminal moment,” as McCain said. This was to be the appropriators’ last hurrah. In the end, they couldn’t see it through, and it’s not going to get any better for them next year.

He cites McCain who deserves a lot of credit here

Gateway points out that there were plenty of republicans who started the day on board:

Reid says nine Republican senators approached him today to tell him that while they would like to see the bill passed, they could not vote for it.

This is very believable.

Interestingly enough the Frum Forum just quotes Politico but has no comments. I guess tea party victories aren’t worth commenting about over there.

Gay Patriot points out that this is happening because congress didn’t do its job:

You mean, Congress hasn’t even acted to fund the government for the current fiscal year? Wonder if we’re seeing any outrage on the editorial pages of the nation’s major dailies. Guess the Reid-Pelosi Democrats were so busy not letting a crisis go to waste than they created another kind of crisis.

Democrats you did this to yourselves.

Nice Deb isn’t dancing yet:

I hope some deal wasn’t struck with Republicans. I’m sorry I have a suspicious mind, but I do…

Well history would suggest this type of thing.

Cubachi asks a basic question:

Should a bill that will take two days to print and an estimated 50 hours to read on the Senate floor be passed? Of course not

That never stopped them before

Michelle Malkin points out the republican alternative to fund government is more than 2000 pages shorter

This is the Senate Republicans’ one-page joint resolution to keep the government-funded through February 2011 (via GOP Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell):

In fact it is one page and Michelle has it on her site. She also had a play by play of the night in the senate and in the house.

Jane Jameson at Right Wing News isn’t letting her guard down:

Let’s take a deep breath, give each other a tip of the hat, and maybe even enjoy a cocktail but this discredited and dingy Congress grinds on in lame duck session….. so there is no rest.

Put your computer on, pull up the two links to the House and Senate and keep checking to see what they are doing. CALL CALL the numbers below. The Democrats are hoping we will all be too busy with the holidays to care what is happening. DO WHAT YOU CAN.

good advice.

Bottom line we have to be on this every day. This is only the first step but the first step of a journey is always the hardest.

SISU points out the following message from Washington concerning Sarah Palin:

“Seventy-nine percent of Washington elites believe Palin is a ‘negative influence in national politics’ while just 15 percent find her to be ‘a breath of fresh air,'” according to a new Politico poll that defines said elites as “those who live within the D.C. metro area, earn more than $75,000 per year, have at least a college degree and are involved in the political process or policymaking.”

Of course the beltway consider her a negative influence, she has helped lead a peasant’s revolt that threatens their ability to feed at the public though.

And when you look at the activity going on in the lame duck it speaks volumes concerning what people really think (not withstanding reminders that some conservative pundits who now worship at the altar of Ronald Reagan thought him a dunce in the past)

Let’s face it, if they didn’t think the culture of Washington was about to change they wouldn’t bother to be forcing all of the last-minute stuff that they are now. They would know that in the past republican congresses were easily co-oped and they would be able to make deals to keep their own prerogatives flowing.

Yet after a single election they are risking all. Why? I think it’s because their own internals on Sarah Palin and the tea party show she is a lot more popular than pseudo polls (and I guarantee that this poll will be a morning joe topic today to Mika’s delight, outlier or no) pretend she is and they are afraid of actual systemic change.

They are aware that before being picked as McCain’s running mate interviews not out to get her revealed her to be a bright and thoughtful woman and leader. Some people more interested in the party circuit than in actual conservatism hit her because they know her record in opposing Obama, taking substantial policy positions when others hang back, but to do so is to face rejection in Washington.

What’s worse snark not withstanding she doesn’t fear the media, in fact she considers them irrelevant.

The left will always tell you who they are afraid of, and the actions of this congress right now tell me that both the left and establishment republicans are afraid that Sarah Palin can win.

They are wise to believe so

I’m very hard on Joe Scarborough mostly because I like him (I’m always harder on people I like because I expect more from them) but today he said something that is incredibly important.

He was going on about the hypocrisy of both right and left on deficits and said this:

“There are a couple of tea partiers who care about this (the deficit) Rand Paul and Jim DeMint,that’s it!”

Although Joe likely doesn’t know Porkbusters he has a point. The Tea Party crowd doesn’t actually trust the republicans. I could not find a single person in the crowd at the Washington Freedom Works rally who would say they trusted republicans.

A lot of the newly elected republicans in congress got little or no help from the national GOP. This was due to several factors, they were not professional pols, the party didn’t expect them to win, but also because they are committed controlling spending.

Trent Lott gave the game away in July:

the last thing Lott needs is a bunch of unwashed, Tea-Partying right-wingers coming to Washington on a wave of anti-establishment, free-market populism, and messing up the good thing he has going.

“We don’t need a lot of Jim DeMint disciples,” Lott told the Washington Post, referring to the conservative South Carolina senator who has been a gadfly for party leadership and a champion for upstart conservative candidates. “As soon as they get here, we need to co-opt them.”

But Lott is no longer in the Republican leadership — he resigned from the Senate in December 2007, mid-term, just before a law kicked in that would have required him to wait two years before lobbying the Senate. So who is he talking about when he says “we need to co-opt them”?

“We” means the K Street wing of the Republican Party.

There are an awful lot of republicans who are more interested in chairmanships and favors than controlling spending and lowering taxes (and yes they are connected). That group needs to keep the good will of the Tea Party voters who brought them over the top for now so they will play ball, but if they get the chance they will try to turn the newly elected reps.

This is going to be the fight that will dominate Washington over the next 2 years and will determine the party and the country’s future longterm and will actually have a lot to do with both the presidential elections in 2012 and if we have a tea party 3rd party in 2014.

If Morning Joe follows this story, they will have a jump on the rest of the MSM.