Archive for the ‘personal’ Category

Powerline does such a great job dismantling the “arguments” of Lee Feng that there is little to add but there is something I want to say concerning this:

There is definitely some dream-fulfillment going on here, but it isn’t Harry Bradley’s. What is the sum and substance of Think Progress’s expose? Governor Walker’s position is endorsed by a majority of Wisconsin voters, as well as several conservative groups, some of which have gotten modest amounts of support from conservative philanthropists. In what world is that some kind of scandal?

Certainly not in the world of Think Progress, which is entirely a creature of the billionaire left. One curious feature of today’s left is its obsession with “astroturf.” There is a reason why lefties who work for billionaire-funded web sites like Think Progress constantly talk about astroturf: it is the world they live in. They are paid by rich liberals, and the demonstrators who are bused in to left-wing protests are generally union members who are paid to attend. No one on the left does much for free. So lefties find it hard to understand that ordinary citizens (“Tea Partiers”) will turn out at rallies without being paid, that conservative voters vote on principle, not financial self-interest, and that conservative activists act out of conviction, not because they are subsidized by a sugar daddy. Failing to understand that conservatism–unlike liberalism–is a movement of principle, not self-interest, they are constantly looking for the elusive, non-existent money trail.

I recently experienced an entertaining example of this phenomenon. A local columnist who was laid off by the Minneapolis Star Tribune went to work for a web site called MinnPost, which is funded by liberal sugar daddies. He is one of a number of former Strib employees who now work for rich liberals at this site, which may or may not be different from what they were doing at the Star Tribune. Anyway, this reporter referred to me as “one of [Bill Cooper’s] high-profile investments.”

When I see this it gets my blood up. Liberals tend to assume that we conservatives are rolling in it.

Let me tell something to Mr. Feng and Powerline’s pal who got laid off and covered. I have a $1200 mortgage and additional bills each month that total about $2700 not counting local taxes (including gasoline, electric etc). I don’t own a flat screen or high def TV, There isn’t a car in my family newer than a 2000, my cell is a trac-phone because I can’t afford better and at the moment my youngest isn’t being taken for his permit because I can’t afford the $600 for the driving lessons mandated by Massachusetts. My wife has been putting off getting a new set of glasses because right now $400 is a fortune. If my oldest didn’t have an academic scholarship he’d have to work full time because we wouldn’t be able to afford to pay for State College.

Our income currently consists of my wife’s unemployment, $900 in monthly rents (before expenses), whatever I can sell for ads for DaTechGuy on DaRadio minus the cost of the show and whatever comes in via DaTipJar (which has amounted to a whopping $10 this year so far).

Every day I go door to door trying to sell ads for the Radio show. At CPAC I spent an inordinate time in the vendor area pushing the show, yesterday I put another 30 miles on the car with zero ads to show for it. I’m taking in before expenses (but after the cost of the show) less than I did when I was on unemployment. Each month paying the bills is an adventure.

Is there some sour grapes here? Yeah I guess there is. It grates me to hear this stuff from people supported by rich patrons. I suspect that if I suddenly flipped I would find all the patrons I wanted to pay me to document my revelations of the perfidious right.

I WISH I had a conservative sponsor paying just 40k a year. Such a sponsor would mean I wouldn’t have to choose between covering the rallies in Boston today or going door to door to sell my ads. Mr. Feng feel free to send my name to the Koch brothers, the Bradley foundation, and any other conservative foundation you want. Then when you write about me being financed by conservative foundations I’ll say “Yup”.

Of course my father who worked harder than I ever will likely have to would likely answer. “Stop complaining and get to work.” He’s right.

Advertisements

Doing the Math… Shy a couple of hundred

Posted: February 20, 2011 by datechguy in economy, personal
Tags:

In doing the Math (ok the books) I see that I’m a couple of hundred short, likely due to car repairs and the increased price of gas as I venture from town to town to sell my ads door to door.

I haven’t done a lot of tip Jar shaking lately, mostly because I’m trying to make it via the show alone, but if you think this blog is worth the time and effort and you can spare a $20 or two this month, it would be quite appreciated.

…last night.

She e-mailed and after getting back from the Tea Party Bowling league (we still need bowlers to roll off BTW more details here and in a new post) I gave her a ring and answered a series of questions she had.

Dealing with the MSM in this way is a new experience for me. As you know I generally pretty hard on them but seemed a very nice young lady and was happy to answer her questions.

Now ironically in my door to door trips yesterday I met a man who was involved in the hijacking TWA Flight 847, was interviewed by the NYT and is still angry at the way he was treated and quoted in the piece he was interviewed.

One says you only get one chance to make a first impression, being me I’m assuming the best and will be very interested in reading what she writes.

At the time Ronald Reagan was elected I was a democrat who was a hawk on defense.

My greatest influence was a professor Ed Thomas. He had a great love of history and of original documents. He used to say about Ronald Reagan. “I’m afraid of Ronald Reagan”. He seemed to think that Reagan would turn the cold war into a hot one. I was more worried about his economic policies myself

Hindsight is 2020 and looking back now it seems clear that such a worry was unfounded but at the time a lot of people didn’t know what would come. The best experts thought the Soviets were a lot stronger than they were. Reagan had a better grasp of both the international and the economic situation than others did.

It took me a long time to figure this out. It wasn’t until the late 80’s and early 90’s that I understood just how great Reagan was.

Yesterday on the phones of talk radio , seminar callers armed with Media Matters Talking points were spinning Reagan on both National shows (such as Rush) and on local shows (Howie Carr) with a “why do conservatives love Reagan when he did xyz” trying to paint him as “not conservative”.

Their attempts to co-op the memory of Reagan are understandable, they have been unable to change our memory of the Reagan years and have also not managed to make us forget what they thought of him, to wit:

It should never be forgotten that the Left hated Reagan just as lustily as they hated George W. Bush, and with some of the same venomous affectations, such as the reductio ad Hitlerum. The key difference is that in Reagan’s years there was no Internet with which to magnify these derangements, and the 24-hour cable-news cycle was in its infancy. But the signs were certainly abundant. In 1982, the Madame Tussauds Wax Museum in London held a vote for the most hated people of all time, with the result being: Hitler, Margaret Thatcher, Ronald Reagan, and Dracula. Democratic congressman William Clay of Missouri charged that Reagan was trying to replace “the Bill of Rights with fascist precepts lifted verbatim from Mein Kampf.” A desperate Jimmy Carter charged that Reagan was engaging in “stirrings of hate” in the 1980 campaign. Los Angeles Times cartoonist Paul Conrad drew a panel depicting Reagan plotting a fascist putsch in a darkened Munich beer hall. Harry Stein (now a conservative convert) wrote in Esquire that the voters who supported Reagan were like the “good Germans” in “Hitler’s Germany.” In The Nation, Alan Wolfe wrote: “The United States has embarked on a course so deeply reactionary, so negative and mean-spirited, so chauvinistic and self-deceptive that our times may soon rival the McCarthy era.”

And in discussing Reagan’s greatest acknowledged achievement — ending the Cold War — liberals conveniently omit that they opposed him at every turn. Who can forget the relentless scorn heaped on Reagan for the “evil empire” speech and the Strategic Defense Initiative? Historian Henry Steele Commager said the “evil empire” speech “was the worst presidential speech in American history, and I’ve read them all.” “What is the world to think,” New York Times columnist Anthony Lewis wrote, “when the greatest of powers is led by a man who applies to the most difficult human problem a simplistic theology?”

Or as Jonah Goldberg puts it the only good conservative is a dead one.

While the encomiums to Reagan & Co. are welcome, the reality is that very little has changed. As we saw in the wake of the Tucson shootings, so much of the effort to build up conservatives of the past is little more than a feint to tear down the conservatives of the present. It’s an old game. For instance, in 1980, quirky New Republic writer Henry Fairlie wrote an essay for the Washington Post in which he lamented the rise of Reagan, “the most radical activist of them all.” The title of his essay: “If Reagan Only Were Another Coolidge . . . ”

Even then, the only good conservative was a dead conservative.

Goldberg is spot on. It is a simple attempt to use Reagan to hit the conservatives of today.

I would suggest skipping the tributes from liberals for they come from the same sentiment as this scene from Braveheart (script via corkey.net):

Robert: Does anyone know his politics?

Craig: No, but his weight with the commoners can unbalance everything. The Balliols will kiss his arse so we must.

The American people honor Reagan’s memory so the left which hates him and always has hated him must too or at least seem to honor him. Ignore them and instead concentrate on one like this from No Sheeples here.

Ronald Reagan was a great president, perhaps the greatest in my lifetime, I wish I appreciated him more when he was in power.

Update: Interesting Palin/Reagan note from Byron York

Lee Edwards, a Reagan biographer and fellow at the Heritage Foundation, was in the audience and took note of the fact that Palin was speaking to a strongly conservative group at the Ranch Center. She likely wouldn’t be invited to speak to a more general audience at the Reagan Library, Edwards said, “because she’s not a member of the establishment, and they’re not comfortable with her.”

“The irony,” Edwards continued, “is that neither was Reagan.”