Archive for March 18, 2011

College basketball fans in Massachusetts following the NIT tournament were delighted when Boston College the #1 seed advanced winning their first round game 82-64 over McNeese State.

That victory moves them to a 2nd round game against the 4th Seed Northwestern tomorrow at 11 a.m.

Which puts them right on top of my 2nd hour. Meaning that DaTechGuy on DaRadio will be a cut down version running from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. tomorrow, with my guest Susannah Fleetwood editor of The Minority Report and blogger extraordinaire.

We will be talking about The Minority Report, Libya, Israel and if we can fit it in the Wisconsin Ruling.

Make sure your station is tuned to WCRN all morning tomorrow and EVERY saturday starting at 6 a.m. as we bring you the best of conservative talk The Wesley & Weston Review ( 6 a.m.) Conservatively Speaking ( 7 a.m.) , Carol Ann Brown ( 9 a.m. ) and DaTechGuy on DaRadio (10 a.m.) followed by BC Basketball!

And remember you can listen live here.

All on WCRN, the home of Red Sox Baseball!

Advertisements

Cross posted at the Minority Report:

The internet has had a liberating impact for humanity. It allows the average person access to more information faster than kings and presidents of old. It is a platform for everyone from Charlie Sheen to protesters in Egypt to express themselves.

The internet is also unforgiving. The teenage girl who decides to make a few hundred bucks posing unclad in front of a camera may find that image googled during a job interview. The intemperate e-mail sent in anger will find itself forwarded to thousands. And if you choose to make threats, don’t think you will be able to hide behind an assumed name. A great example of this took place on St. Patrick’s day last.

During the late unpleasantness in Wisconsin, blogger Ann Althouse (who lives in the area) and her husband Lawrence Meade provided invaluable coverage, interviewing protesters and providing video that showed what was actually happening. It allowed millions to bypass the MSM who choose to whitewash the protests and their aftermath.
(more…)

…run to the courts:

Dane County Circuit Judge Maryann Sumi issued a temporary restraining order Friday, barring the publication of a controversial new law that would sharply curtail collective bargaining for public employees.

Sumi’s order will prevent Secretary of State Doug La Follette from publishing the law until she can rule on the merits of the case. Dane County Ismael Ozanne is seeking to block the law because he says a legislative committee violated the state’s open meetings law.

Sumi said Ozanne was likely to succeed on the merits.

This is now going to be appealed and appealed to death.

Quick question. Now that the democrats are back, why not just bring up the first bill? Let them run away again, I’m sure that will go over well, and as Ed Morrissey said:

However, this is strictly a ruling on the process used to enact the law. If it came down to it, the Wisconsin legislature could simply pass it again, and it could do so rather quickly. The TRO is not based on any defect in the legislation itself.

I’d expect the legislature to take that up very quickly. I’d also expect some of the protesters to return in anticipation of that effort, although most of them probably won’t get away with taking more sick time to do so. Walker and the GOP could render this issue moot by Monday or Tuesday of next week, if need be, although they’d be wise not to tip their hand until Monday.

I wouldn’t be popping the corks if I was the left, but expect that to a big topic this weekend.

Let’s see, removing a tyrant dictator with bloodthirsty sons who controls a lot of oil and has been killing his people for years.

Yup that sounds like Iraq to me.

Can someone explain to me how Morning Joe is going on about that “we might be too late” while advocating an Afghan pullout?

I hope it works, but I think Gaddafi takes Benghazi before a single plane makes it in the air unless Egypt invades first.

Update: Boy I think I’ve never been proven wrong so fast:

Foreign Minister Moussa Koussa says Libya is declaring an immediate cease-fire and stopping all military operations.

Friday’s decision comes after the U.N. voted to authorized a no-fly zone and “all necessary measures” to protect the Libyan people, including airstrikes.

Koussa says the cease-fire “will take the country back to safety” and ensure security for all Libyans.

I actually didn’t think that Gaddafi was this smart. By calling a ceasefire he gets the chance to consolidate the gains he has made. He takes away the ability of NATO and the west to strike. As long as they are not attacking they will have a hard time justifying bombing.

This will also force the rebels in Benghazi to actually form a government and act like one. How they act and what they do will also be instructive.

Additionally Gaddafi is an old man, if this goes into a long diplomatic negotiation he will be able to string things along for at the very least months, and perhaps years. The end result? Either a partition or a face saving resignation and transfer of power to his sons.

This may or may not work out, but the solution will not be a quick one.

Update 2: Ed Morrissey comments

Imagine if the UN had been pressed into action two or three weeks ago. Rebels would still hold a large portion of Libya, and Gaddafi’s military would be forced to make a choice between an aging tyrant rapidly losing leverage and a populace clearly ready to seize its own destiny. Even a week ago, rebels still held key positions and Gaddafi was having trouble mounting any large-scale offensives.

Now Gaddafi can afford to offer a cease-fire. It protects his air force while changing very little on the ground. He has the main rebellion cut off in Benghazi and has secured his control over the other rebellious areas. He can afford to wait out the rebels and lay siege to Libya’s second-largest city, secure in the knowledge that the West won’t further intervene. It took them this long to arrange the no-fly zone, and Gaddafi knows that the West has no interest in another ground war in the region (and for good reasons).