Three Cheers for Market Basket

Posted: December 2, 2010 in culture, oddities
Tags: , , ,

Market Basket knows what day it is!

For having this picture in their window.

Market Basket is handling this exactly the right way. By putting a sign that explicitly says Merry Christmas they are eschewing the political correctness that has frightened and intimidated the multitudes.

What many business don’t understand is that by trying to placate a vocal and angry minority they actually upset the vast majority of customers who have many other alternatives for shopping. When I see “Happy Holidays” as opposed to Merry Christmas I am inclined to spend my money elsewhere and I’ll wager a lot of other people are too.

And for the few in the “tolerant left” who do not want “Merry Christmas” on anything Market Basket has not ignored your, nor have they ignored those who don’t celebrate Christmas but are not as easily agitated as some. Take a look at the poster next to the first one

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays, Side by side in perfect harmony

This allows everybody to take a deep breath, the explicit Christmas poster allows them to say “Happy Holidays” elsewhere without insult because of the acknowledgment of the actual federal holiday that the country celebrates.

Would that more business’ had that degree of courage and common sense.

Comments
  1. Roxeanne de Luca says:

    Good for Market Basket!

    The “holidays” thing has gotten out of control. First, most non-churchgoing people in America celebrate Christmas (at least in the Santa/stockings/elves/tree part). The few people who don’t celebrate it are either doing so out of spite, or because they have a different religion. If it’s the latter, the solution is to wish everyone a joyful time at their particular holy days (Channukah, Passover, Eid, etc.); if it’s the former, well, society has never been in the business of catering to the misanthropic, now has it?

    It’s gotten so foolish that people talk about “holiday” ornaments, as if anyone actually hangs up ornaments on a tree for Memorial Day or the Fourth of July.