NPR Ombudsman: Yeah Williams had it coming

Posted: October 22, 2010 in internet/free speech, media, opinion/news, short films/interviews
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How will NPR react to the firestorm, why they will double down:

That said, Williams provided a valuable voice on NPR. His long experience as a journalist and background as an authority on the Civil Rights movement enabled him to offer insights that often enriched the network’s reporting.

Ultimately, however, it seems management felt he had become more of a liability than an asset. Unfortunately, I agree.

Yup, perhaps about $1,800,000 worth of assets.

And of course it isn’t about firing a black man who appears on a conservative show: (emphasis mine)

It can’t be overlooked that this episode is occurring in a toxic political environment where people are quick to take sides and look for hidden motives. I fear some will look for racial motivations in NPR’s decision to fire Williams, who is African-American and one of the few black male NPR voices.

It’s not about race. It’s also not about free speech, as some have charged. Nor is it about an alleged attempt by NPR to stifle conservative views. NPR offers a broad range of viewpoints on its radio shows and web site.

I’m sure NPR has plenty of empathy for organization with few blacks who fire them and I’m sure they haven’t tolerated outrageous statement before, oh wait:

— Also in 2005, NPR apologized to Mark Levin, author of “Men in Black: How the Supreme Court is Destroying America,” after a broadcast of its program “Day to Day” falsely accused him of advocating violence against judges. Levin accepted the apology, but said the broadcast was “illustrative of a smear campaign launched by the Left to try and silence” his criticisms of judicial activism.

— In 2002, the head of NPR issued an apology six months after a report linking anthrax-laced letters to a Christian conservative organization.

— Also in 2002, during an interview with the Philadelphia City Paper, NPR host Tavis Smiley said he strived to do a show that is “authentically black,” but not “too black.”

— In 1995, Nina Totenberg, NPR’s award-winning legal affairs correspondent, was allowed to keep her job after telling the host of PBS’ “Inside Washington” that if there was “retributive justice” in the world, former North Carolina Sen. Jesse Helms would “get AIDS from a transfusion, or one of his grandchildren will get it.”

In my opinion this is a perfect example of a cultural elite that only survives due to sugar daddies and don’t dare to upset them. Period!

Bad form NPR, Bad form

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